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Full text of "Housing and relocation study, St. Petersburg, Florida, 1969"

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HOUSING AND RELOCATION STUDY 



ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA 



1969 



This Plan \A/as adopted by the 
City Council of St. Petersburg 
On September 18, 1969 

By 
Resolution No. 69-592 



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TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PART I HOUSING 

I. INTRODUCTION 1 

II. HOUSING INVENTORY 2 

III. OCCUPANCY CHARACTERISTICS 2 

Occupied Units 2 

Vacancy Characteristics 3 

Family Income 3 

IV. STRUCTURAL CHARACTERISTICS 5 

V. DEMAND FOR SUBSIDIZED HOUSING 10 

Existing Low - Moderate Income Housing 10 

Additional Requirements for Subsidized Housing — 13 

VI. FEDERAL PROGRAMS 13 

PART II RELOCATION 

I. INTRODUCTION 19 

II. SURVEY OF 1-75 RELOCATION IMPACT 20 

Housing Inventory 20 

Structural Characteristics 20 

Family Incomes 23 

Housing Values and Rents 23 

Vacancy Rates 26 

III. FEDERAL RELOCATION ASSISTANCE 26 

State Department of Transportation 26 

Federal Housing Programs 29 



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1 I 



LIST OF TABLES 



Number Title 



1 Number of Housing Units by Decade 2 

2 Connponents of the Housing Inventory 4 

3 Estimated Percent Distribution of Ail Families 

By Annual Income, 1959 and 1969 6 

4 Distribution of Families by Income Range 7 

5 Estinnated Percent Distribution of All Families 

By Annual Income, 1969 8 

6 Incomes of Families Presently Living in 

Substandard Housing Units and Related 
Rent Paying Ability and Home Purchasing 
Ability 9 

7 Substandard Housing Units by Census Tracts - 1 1 

8 Estimated Demand for Subsidized Housing by 

Unit Size 13 

9 Inventory of Existing and Proposed Housing 

Projects 14 

10 Estimated Occupancy Potential, 1969 

Rent - Supplement Housing by Unit Size 16 

11 Estimated Occupancy Potential, 1969 

Home Ownership by Unit Size 17 

12 Estimated Occupancy Potential, 1969 

Rental Housing by Unit Size 17 

13 Estimated Occupancy Potential, 1969 

Rehabilitation Housing by Unit Size 18 

14-A 1-75 Total Survey Summary 21 

14-B 1-75 Do\A/ntONA/n Distributor Survey 22 

15 1-75 Substandard Units to be Displaced 24 



Number Title 

16 1-75 Estimated Median Income, Rent Paying 

Ability and Home Purchasing Ability of 
Relocatees 25 

17 1-75 Average Home Value and Average 

Contract Rent 27 



Map A Residential Blight by Census Tracts 12 

Map B Interstate System - 1-75 30 



r 



HOUSING STUDY 

I. INTRODUCTION 

The Housing and Relocation Study as a part of the 
Workable Program for Community Improvennent is primarily 
concerned with the elimination of slum and blight within the 
City of St. Petersburg. Two major concerns of this study 
are an adequate supply of standard housing for low and 
moderate income families and the ability of the community to 
provide housing for those families displaced by governmental 
action. The study is designed to initiate a survey of the local 
housing market in order to identify and analyze the Io\a/ and 
moderate income families presently living in substandard 
housing; to prepare a program for provision of sound housing 
for those families living in substandard housing; and to pro- 
vide for replacement of all housing units to be removed from 
the housing inventory by governmental action. 

Part I (Housing) is concerned with development of an 
information base for analysis of the low and moderate income 
housing market and Part II (Relocation) is directed toward 
the problem of replacement housing for low and nnoderate 
income families displaced due to the extension of 1-75 into 
the St. Petersburg area. 



2. 



II. HOUSING INVENTORY 

The City of St. Petersburg had 97,696 housing units 
as of April, 1969. This was an increase of 16,350, or 
20.1% over the 1960 Inventory. The numerical increase was 
only about one-half of the 1950 to 1960 increase indicating a 
possible leveling of the phenomenal growth rate experienced 
during the 1950's. A comparison of the number of housing 
units in the inventory from 1 930 to 1 969 is presented in 
Table 1 . 

TABLE 1 





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jnnber of 


H 


ousing 


Units by 


D 


ecade 




Deca 




Nunnber 






Numerical 






Percentage 














Increase 






Increase 


1930 






22,848 






— 






— 


1940 






27,945 






5,097 






22.3 


1950 






42,881 






14,936 






53.5 


1960 






81 ,346 






38,465 






89.7 


1969 






97,696 






16,350 






20. 1 



III. OCCUPANCY CHARACTERISTICS 

Occupied Units : The number of occupied units increased 
from 70,734 to 92,260, a gain of 30.4%, between 1960 and 
April 1969. Seventy-two percent of the occupied units are 
owner occupied and 28% renter occupied. White owners 



make up 95% of the owner occupied category and white renters 
75% of the renter occupied units. Whereas, nonwhite owners 
account for only 5% of the owner occupied units and nonwhite 
renters for 25% of the renter occupied units. A comparison 
of change in occupied units for 1950, 1960 and 1969 can be 
obtained from Table 2, Components of the Housing inventory . 

Vacancy Characteristics : The vacancy rate within the 
St. Petersburg housing inventory has fluctuated from an 
alarming high of almost 30% in 1940 to a low of 5.6% in 1969. 
The vacancy survey conducted by the Postal Department 
during January 1969, reflected a 2.8% vacancy rate (1,895 
units) for units available for sale and a 3.1% (823 units) 
vacancy rate for units available for rent. A comparison of 
the trend in vacancy rates for 1950, 1960 and 1969 can be 
obtained from Table 2, Components of the Housing Inventory . 
The potential demand of approximately 4,000 units needed for 
replacement of substandard housing and housing displaced by 
1-75 could further reduce the vacancy rate to the point of 
curtailing mobility within the local housing market. 

Family Income : The percent of SJ . Petersburg families 
in the low and moderate income range is 21% and 32% respec- 
tively. There are 19,375 families in the low income range, 
those earning less than $3,000 per year, and 29,523 families 
in the moderate income range, those earning between $3,000 



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and $6,000 per year. A comparison of family income 
distribution in 1959 and 1969 indicates a substantial decrease 
in the percentage of families earning less than $3,000 per 
year. Ho\A/ever, as indicated in Table 3, Percent Distri - 
bution of All Families by Annual Income, 1959 and 1969 , the 
percentage of low Income families in the areas of the City 
presently containing over 3% substandard housing units is 
proportionally greater than the City average. The number 
of families VA/ithIn each income range is shown in Table 4, 
Distribution of All Families by Income Range, 1969 . 

An analysis of the number of families living in substandard 
housing by income range and their rent paying ability or home 
purchasing ability is shown in Table 6, Incomes of Families 
Presently Living in Substandard Housing Units and Related 
Rent Paying Ability and Home Purchasing Ability . As Indicated 
by Table 6, there are no vacant rental units or sales honnes 
available In a standard condition that are within the purchasing 
ability of the 1 ,473 families presently living in substandard 
housing and earning less than $3,000 per year. 
IV. STRUCTURAL CHARACTERISTICS 

A City-wide survey of housing conditions revealed that 
there are approximately 2,135 substandard housing units in 
St. Petersburg as of July, 1969. The substandard units 
are located throughout the City, with the largest concentration 



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10. 



around the older core area. It should be noted that approxi- 
mately 65% of all substandard housing units are located in four 
census tracts - 209, 210, 211 and 216. As indicated by 
Table 7, Substandard Housing Units by Census Tracts. 1969 . 
the heaviest concentration of substandard housing is to be found 
in census tract 211 where 501 (38%) of the 1,307 housing 
units are in a substandard condition. Substandard condition, 
as defined for this survey, constitutes housing units that are 
not fit for human habitat, nor economically rehabilitable and, 
therefore, should be removed from the housing inventory. 
Map A, Residential Blight by Census Tracts shows the areas 
of substandard housing for the City. 
V. DEMAND FOR SUBSIDIZED HOUSING 

The estimated demand for housing to replace the 2,135 
substandard units is indicated by unit size in Table 8. It is 
assumed that all families presently living in substandard housing 
will require some form of subsidy to obtain sound housing. 
Therefore , the demands shown in Table 8 are analyzed by 
specific Federal Programs in Section VI of this study. 

An inventory of existing and proposed housing projects 
In the City of St. Petersburg indicates that there is a critical 
shortage of subsidized housing units with two bedrooms or 
more. It appears that the ennphasis has been placed on housing 
for the elderly, when in reality the families living in substandard 



II 



1 1 



TABLE 7 

SUBSTANDARD HOUSING UNITS BY CENSUS TRACT 
ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA 1969 



Census Existing Substandard Units Census Existing 
Tract Units Nunnber Percent Tract Units 



Substandard Units 
Number Percent 



201 .01 


1, 


376 


20 


1.4 


225.01 


1 


476 


— 





201 .02 


753 








225.02 


1 


,499 


4 


.2 


202.01 


982 








225.03 


1 


,964 


— 





202.02 


1 ,277 








226.01 


1 


,199 


2 


.1 


202.03 


2, 


268 








226.02 


1 


,910 


— 





203 


2, 


645 


8 


.3 


227 


1 


,517 


8 


.5 


204 


1 , 


402 


9 


.6 


228.01 


1 


253 


9 


.7 


205 


2, 


427 


16 


.6 


228.02 


1 


440 


— 





206 


1 , 


871 


43 


2.2 


229 


2 


257 


20 


.8 


207 


1 , 


987 


65 


3.2 


230 


1 


690 


16 


.9 


208 


1 , 


912 


22 


1.1 


231 




817 


25 


3.0 


209 


2, 


076 


247 


11 .8 


232 


1 


560 


8 


.5 


210 


1 , 


863 


355 


19.0 


233 


1 


,312 


5 


.3 


211 


1 , 


307 


501 


38.3 


234 


1 


560 


55 


3.5 


212 


2, 


308 


90 


3.8 


235 


2 


987 


31 


1 .0 


213 


1 


972 


71 


3.6 


236 


2 


926 


46 


1.5 


214 


2 


537 


14 


.5 


237 


1 


,323 


4 


.3 


215 


3 


,400 


26 


.7 


238 


1 


393 


6 


.4 


216 


1 


,260 


253 


20.0 


239 


1 


,019 


5 


.4 


217 


1 


,244 


47 


3.7 


240.01 


1 


,276 


— 





218 


1 


,216 


18 


1.4 


240.02 


1 


,376 


— 





219 


1 


,293 


9 


.6 


240.03 


1 


,623 


— 





220 


1 


,434 


8 


.5 


241 


1 


,964 


4 


.2 


221 


2 


,359 


15 


.6 


242 


2 


,279 


13 


.5 


222 


1 


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243.01 


1 


,661 


1 


.1 


223 


2 


,579 


8 


.3 


243.02 




766 


— 





224.01 


1 


,599 


3 


.1 


244.01 


2 


,035 


10 


.4 


224.02 


2 


,204 


10 


.4 


244.02 


2 


,138 


5 


.2 


Totals 


for City 








97 


696 


2, 135 


2.1 



Source: Survey by Planning Departnnent 8-22 July 1969. 



12 



LEGEND 



0-37e Substandard 



^ 3-10-/. 

10-40% " 




Residential Blight By Census Tracts 



MAP "A" 



13. 



housing are large families in the younger age brackets. As 
indicated in Table 9, Inventory of Existing and Proposed 
Housing Projects , there are 1,463 existing housing units 
for low income families. Of these, approximately 62% are 
utilized for housing of the elderly. In addition, there are 
765 units presently in the proposed stage . Of these , approx- 
imately 90% are envisioned as senior citizen housing. 

TABLE 8 

ESTIMATED DEMAND FOR SUBSIDIZED HOUSING 

BV UNIT SIZE 
ST. PETERSBURG. FLORIDA 1969 

Unit Size Number of Units 

Efficiency 433 

One Bedroom 703 

Two Bedroom 329 

Three Bedroom 257 

Four Bedroom ' 159 

Five Bedroom 254 



2, 135 



Source: Planning Departnnent Estimates. 

VI. FEDERAL PROGRAMS 

Federal assistance for development of new housing for 
loNA/ and moderate inconne families is available through four 



14. 



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15. 



basic programs currently administered by the Federal Housing 
Administration (F.H.A.). These programs are, (1) Monthly 
rent supplement payments in rental projects financed with be- 
low market interest rate mortgages under Section 22 Id (3); 
(2) Partial payments for Interest on home mortgages Insured 
under Section 235; (3) Partial payments for interest on rental 
project mortgages insured under Section 236; and (4) Below 
market interest rate financing for projects insured under Sec- 
tion 221d (3). In addition, Section 221 (h) provides F.H.A. 
Insured market rate mortgages for the purchase, rehabilitation, 
and sale of residential properties to eligible families. 

Eligibility for Federal subsidy programs is determined by 
evidence that a fannily's Inconne is below established limits for 
the specific program. Some families may be eligible for 
assistance under more than one Federal program. There- 
fore, eligibility and occupancy potentials discussed In the 
following paragraphs are not adjusted to reflect contingent 
reductions due to housing provided under alternative progranns 
and are not additive. 

The family eligibility estimates for the following progranns 
were developed using regular Income limits based on 1 35% 
of the St. Petersburg public housing Income limits. Family 
Incomes were derived by calculating 1969 incomes from the 
1959 income distribution tables in the 1960 Census of Housing 
and Population. 



16. 



Section 22 Id (3) with Rent Supplement : Under the 
rent-supplement program there is an occupancy potential for 
approximately 1,673 units. This potential would achieve 
maximunn absorption if distributed as shown in Table 10. 

TABLE 10 



ESTIMATED 


OCCUPANCY POTENTIAL 


^ 1969 


RENT - SUPPLEMENT 


HOUSING BY UNIT SIZE 


Unit Size 


N 


jnnber 


Unit Size 


Number 




Of 


Units 




Of Units 


Efficiency 




286 


Pour Bedroom 


116 


One Bedroom 




471 


Pive Bedroom 


184 


T\^/o Bedroom 




275 


Total 


1 ,673 


Three Bedroom 




187 







The elderly would probably account for all of the 
efficiency units of the rent-supplement potential and about 45% 
of the one bedroom units. All of the families eligible for rent 
supplennents are also eligible for public housing in Si. Petersburg 

Section 235. Home Ownership : Home ownership for 
lo\^ to nnoderate income families could be provided through 
utilization of interest reduction payments by the Pederal Govern- 
ment under the provisions of Section 235. It is estimated that 
there is an occupancy potential for 885 units under this program. 
The low nunnber of eligible families, when compared with other 
programs, is based on the assumption that those families earning 



17. 



less than $2,000 pen year cannot afford to purchase a home 
even with the aid of Federal subsidies. A suggested distri- 
bution of the 885 potential units is shown in Table 1 1 . 

TABLE n 

ESTIMATED OCCUPANCY POTENTIAL-. 1969 
HOME OWNERSHIP BY UNIT SIZE 

Unit Size Number Unit Size Number 
Of Units Of Units 

One Bedroom 327 Four Bedroom 68 

Two Bedroom 164 Five Bedroonn 114 



Three Bedroom 112 Total 885 

Section 236, Rental Housing : Section 236 provides 
assistance through the use of interest reduction payments by 
the Federal Government thus allowing a reduction in housing 
expenses to the low and moderate income renter. Under 
this program approximately 1,909 families are eligible for 
assistance. The occupancy potential is best distributed as 
shown in Table 12. 

TABLE 12 



ESTIMATED 


OCCUPANCY POTENTIAL, 1969 


RENTAL 


HOUSING BY UNIT SIZE 


Unit Size 


N 
Of 


umber 
Units 


Unit Size Number 
Of Units 


Efficiency 
One Bedroom 




359 
599 
348 
234 


Four Bedroom 140 
Five Bedroom 299 


Two Bedroom 
Three Bedroom 


Total 1 ,909 



18. 



r 

I. 

r 

Section 221 (h) Rehabilitation : Provides F.H.A. ^ 

insured nnarket rate mortgages for the purchase, rehabilita- l 
tlon and sale of homes to eligible families. Under this 

program approximately 1,699 families are eligible with occu- ■ 



pancy distribution as shown on Table 13. 

TABLE 13 

ESTIMATED OCCUPANCY POTENTIAL. 1969 
REHABILITATION HOUSING BY UNIT SIZE 

Unit Size Number Unit Size Number 
Of Units Of Units 

One Bedroom 853 Four Bedroom 128 

Two Bedroom 307 Five Bedroom 198 



F 

F 

r 



Three Bedroom 213 Total 1,699 



19 



RELOCATION STUDY 

I. INTRODUCTION 

The Relocation Study is concerned \A/ith providing for 
replacement of all housing units to be removed from the housing 
inventory by governnnental action. There are three agencies 
in St. Petersburg that are presently coordinating the relocation 
progranns for all families and individuals displaced by govern- 
mental action in the community. These agencies are the St. 
Petersburg Housing Authority, The St. Petersburg Relocation 
Officer, and The Florida State Departnnent of Transportation 
Relocation Office. 

Relocation assistance is available for various displacement 
situations, but the project which is demanding attention at this 
time is that connected with the extension of interstate Highway 
75 through St. Petersburg. The State Department of Trans- 
portation has established a local relocation office to provide 
relocation assistance for this specific project. The State has 
qualified for 100% relocation funds from ihe Pederal Highway 
Program. Therefore, all monies necessary for the highway 
relocation are available. 

The City Relocation Officer has made a study of the 
facts concerning the highway relocation project and is co- 
operating w/ith the Departnnent of Transportation whenever 
possible . 



20. 



This study is based on complete displacement figures 
for the Interstate construction. Actual yearly displacements 
are adjusted to fit the construction timetables furnished by the 
State Department of Transportation in their one-year and five- 
year construction proposals dated 27 August 1969. 
II. SURVEY OF 1-75 RELOCATION IMPACT 

Housing Inventory : A State Department of Transpor- 
tation survey was taken to obtain a count of the families and 
businesses to be displaced by the interstate, and a door to 
door survey conducted by the Department to determine the 
statistics needed In order to provide full relocation assistance. 

Much of the information given on the various tables in 
this study is by the census tracts through which the interstate 
passes. The tracts are listed in order as they occur on the 
interstate route from 54th Avenue North to 54th Avenue South. 

Structural Characteristics : A total of 2,050 residential 
units will be displaced by the interstate. Of this total, 718 
units were found to be in the path of the right-of-way of the 
two downtown distributors. A detailed breakdown of these 
figures can be found in Table 14-A, 1-75 Total Survey Sum- 
mary and Table 14-B, 1-75 Downtown Distributors Survey , 
respectively. 

Of the total 2,050 residential units to be displaced, 292 
units, or 14%, were found to be substandard. The heaviest 



21 



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TABLE 14-B 

1-75 DOWNTOWN DISTRIBUTOR SURVEY 
ST. PETERSBURG. FLORIDA, 1969 

5th Avenue North Distributor (16th Street to 6th Street) 

Residential Units to be Displaced - 1 95 

Standard Substandard Total 

White 118 - 118 

Nonwhite 70 7 77 

Total 188 7 195 

5th Avenue South Distributor {16th Street to 4th Street) 

Residential Units to be Displaced - 523 

Standard Substandard Total 

White 173 - 173 

Nonwhite 243 107 350 

Total 416 107 523 

Total Displacements due to Downtown Distributors - 718 

Standard Substandard Total 

White 291 - 291 

Nonwhite 313 1 14 427 

Total 604 114 718 



23 



concentration of substandard units exists in the nonwhite core 
areas of the City. These pockets of blight will be the problem 
areas of the relocation program. A breakdovA/n of the 
substandard residential units by census tract can be found 
on Table 15, 1-75 Substandard Units to be Displaced . 

During the 1970-71 certification period a total of 1,650 
residential units will be displaced by 1-75. Of this number, 
there are 899 white housing units and 771 nonvA/hite housing 
units. This figure does not include the 5th Avenue North 
Distributor, with 195 residential units, or the area from 13th 
Avenue South to the Skyway, with 205 residential units. 
These remaining 400 units will be displaced during the next 
certification period. 

Family Incomes : The displaced persons' current median 
Incomes range from $3,301 to $7,978. These median incomes 
and the related honne purchasing ability and monthly rent 
paying ability are shown on Table 16, 1-75 Estimated 
Median Income. Rent Paying Ability and Home Purchasing 
Ability of Relocatees . 

Housing Value and Rents : The estimated current value 
of the honnes and the current rent of the rental units which 
are adjacent to or within the right-of-way \A/ere arrived at 
by Increasing the 1960 United States Census of Housing 
figures by 26%. This increase takes Into account cost of living 



24. 



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26. 



increase and also depreciation of the dwellings. These 
figures are shown on Table 17, 1-75 Average Home Value 
and Average Contract Rent by Blocks Within the Census 
Tracts. 

Vacancy Rates : The number and value or rent of va- 
cant units which are available within the City can be found 
within the Housing Study on Table 6, Incomes of Families 
Presently Living in Substandard Housing Units and Related 
Rent Paying Ability and Home Purchasing Ability, 1969. 

The total vacancy rate of standard units for the City 
is 2.8% available sale and 3.1% available rent. These units, 
however, are not all within the purchase or rental range or 
of the size required by the persons being displaced. There- 
fore, certain community action must be taken to provide 
proper relocation assistance in this project. 
III. FEDERAL RELOCATION ASSISTANCE 

State Department of Transportation : The major pro- 
gram being used is that set up by the State Department of 
Transportation under the requirements of the 1968 Federal 
Aid to Highways Act. As a result of this act, people living 
in the path of an interstate road are entitled to a wide range 
of advisory and monetary assistance. 

The staff of the Relocation Services Office is prepared 
to help displaced persons to find a decent, safe and sanitary 



27. 



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28. 



place to live in a neighborhood they desire and at a sales 
or rental price they can afford. Under the relocation progrann, 
the relocation agents are to help the displaced persons find a 
connparable dwelling, or one which, when compared with the 
dwelling taken, is substantially equal regarding all major char- 
acteristics and functionally equivalent with respect to: (a) The 
number of rooms; (b) The area of living space; (c) The 
same type of construction; (d) age; (e) State of repair; 
(f) in the same type of neighborhood; and (g) equally acces- 
sible to public services and places of employment. In all 
cases, the dwelling must be, as a minimum, decent, safe 
and sanitary in accord with the Federal standards. 

For each home owner being displaced the relocation 
agents are required to provide three homes, within the cor- 
rect price range, from which the displaced persons can 
choose. Financial compensation is given to the relocatees 
for reasonable moving expenses, and other payments, such 
as supplementary payments and replacement housing payments, 
are nnade in accord with the standards set up by this program. 
The State Department of Transportation's local Relocation 
Office is presently working on this project and will continue 
to provide relocation assistance as the interstate progresses 
through the City. 



29 



Federal Housing Programs : Other Federal Programs 
which could be used to provide relocation assistance in this 
specific situation are as follo\A/s: 

Section 221d (3) with Rent Supplement - Low and 
Moderate Income Housing Program to provide Rental and 
cooperative housing to families whose incomes exclude them 
from standard housing the private market; 

Section 235 - Home Ownership for l_ow Income Families; 

Section 236 - Assistance Program for Rental and 
Cooperative Housing for Lower Income Families. 



30. 



Legend 



Census Tract Boundaries 



Freeway System 



2BDZ 



^ ^26.0P 



BOCA 



CIEGA 




Census Tracts 



MAP "6" 



FL8 

So